Faculty and Staff Resources

Check back for updates! If you have any suggestions or questions, please email Kristen Dabney.

Wondering how to make documents more accessible from the beginning? This resource is for you! 

Listed are small changes that can be made at media creation that has a lasting impact on the accessibility. This includes captioned video, quick tips sheets and links to more detailed explanations to explore. All programs will have descriptions for both Macintosh and Windows machines due to software differences between the platforms. There are a few themes that will show up again and again, such as providing alternative text, or considerations for color contrast. Keeping these details in mind will make a world of a difference.

Microsoft Word

Most text is accessible to assistive technology, but there are some considerations that can make it more accessible for all users. For example, by using Styles the creator can quickly manipulate any changes made to the document. And if the document is shared digitally, allows the readers to adapt the font styles and size to suit their needs. 

Microsoft Word has a built in Accessibility Checker. While it cannot check some things, think color contrast or reasonable alternative text for images. Some things need a person to check as computers do not think, or process, like people do. The checker will walk you through many of the major accessibility barriers and explain why the changes should be made in the process. 

Tips for Microsoft Word Accessibility (.docx) Download

How to Run Check Accessibility with Microsoft 2016 on Macintosh:

How to Run Check Accessibility with Microsoft Word 2016 on Windows:

If more indepth resources are of interest to you, I would recommend checking out Karlen Communications' documentation. The founder Karen McCall has received Microsoft's MVP [Most Valuable Professional] Award for the last seven years for her work with Word document accessibility. The documentation for Microsoft Word 2016 can be found for both Macintosh and Windows machines.

An additional resource is using Lynda.com which is a resource that is available to all Tufts users, and has a wide variety of topics including creating accessible documents. While the length of the full sessions can be hours long, they are well labeled and broken up into 2-4 minute videos. There is a huge resource for any Microsoft Office programs, section 2 is specific to Microsoft Word accessibility particularly on Windows machine.

If you are using a previous version of Microsoft Word, feel free to contact Kristen Dabney for one-on-one training.

 

Adobe Acrobat Pro

The file type PDF was originally created to make sure that how a document was formatted on a computer page was the same as how it would be formatted on a printed document. One of the first barriers present in a PDF document is whether there is any underlying text associated with the image shown on screen. When underlying text is available the document is searchable, can be copy&pasted from, and is more compatible with assistive technologies.

Basics of PDF Accessibility (.docx) Download

How to Check Accessibility with Adobe Acrobat Pro:

Lynda.com is one of the resources that is available to all Tufts users, and has a wide variety of topics including creating documents. While the length of the full sessions can be hours long, they are well labeled and broken up into 2-4 minute videos. Lynda.com has instructions for both Macintosh and Window computers for Adobe Acrobat Pro XI and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC.

Microsoft Excel

Coming Soon.

Microsoft Power Point

Coming Soon.

Videos with Captions

Coming soon.

Macintosh Pages

Coming Soon.