Gender and Sexuality-Related Courses

Current Courses

Note that most of these courses range from having some relevance to LGBT or Queer issues/studies to completely focusing on LGBTQ topics. Please contact the professor for more information.

Course Archives

2013 - 14 Courses

Spring 2014

AMER 0194-04 – Special Topics: American Sixties in Arts and Culture

Block: Wed, 4:30 - 7:15 p.m.
Instructor: Ronna Johnson

American Sixties in Arts and Culture: This multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary course studies the American Sixties through film, literature, music, and nonfiction writing, including memoir, manifesto, letters and journalism. Although called the Sixties, this time of civil dissent, social unrest, domestic violence, international war and change properly encompasses a wider era, from 1954 and Brown v. Board of Education, to 1975 and the end of the Vietnam War, and this broader interval will form the period of our study.

Struggles for social, political, personal, and sexual freedom – all struggles for justice – waged in the Sixties by the civil rights movement, the antiwar movement, the women's movement, and the gay liberation movement provide historical parameters and context for our study. In literature written during and about the era of these movements, we examine how concerns for social and political justice, for individual liberation and spiritual emancipation, are given voice and aesthetic shape, and consider what is distinctive and enduring and why. We will examine images and self-expressions of Americans of diverse ethnicities and races in this era. Subjects include the mid-century civil rights movement and its influence over all subsequent movements for change; the war in Vietnam and its impact beyond the fighting ground; literary implications of New Journalism; folk, rock, soul, and psychedelic musics; the aesthetic expression of consciousness expansion; new wave, no wave, and documentary cinema; the direct and indirect influence on culture and arts, of politics of social change, political unrest, and state violence. We will come to some understandings of legacies of the Sixties, both at the end of the twentieth century and in our own time, considering whether this era is greater than the sum of its parts in our national experience, or whether it is an isolated episode, however colorful and seductive, in our national narrative. Either way or some way in between, we will read and evaluate stories of this era that have been left to us in our historical, artistic, musical, literary, and cinematic record.

ARB 0092 – Special Topics: Gender and Sexuality in the Middle East

Block: Mon, 6:30 - 9 p.m.
Instructor: Thomas Abowd

Selected topics in Arabic literature and culture. Conducted in English. Recent offerings include Arab Culture Today, Love and Literature in Islam: Human and Divine, War Memories: Arab Writing from 1975 to the Present, and Palestinian Literature and Cinema. Please see departmental website for specific details.

CH 0104-01 – Women And Health

Block: Tue, 4:30 - 7 p.m.
Instructor: Meghan Woo

Theoretical approaches to women's health and women's relationship to the health care system. Historical development of women's roles as providers (both lay and professional) and as consumers of health care. Analysis of the emergence of a women's health movement, changes in the past decade, and future directions.

DR 0093-01 – Special Topics: Cabaret

Block: Mon, 1:20 - 4:20 p.m.
Instructor: Laurence Senelick

Advanced projects for independent or group study in acting, directing, designing, and other arts of the theatre, as well as in the history of theatre and drama. Applicants for this course must give evidence of both interest in and capacity for doing specialized work in their chosen project. Credit as arranged. Please see departmental website for specific details.

ED 0162-01 – Class, Race, And Gender In The History Of U.S. Education

Block: Tue, 6:30 - 9 p.m.
Instructor: John Perella

History of education in the United States as a struggle over access and control. Relation to class reproduction, social mobility, the maintenance of and resistance to racial boundaries and gender issues, emphasizing the struggles of disempowered groups to gain access to schooling in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

ED 0192-01 – Special Topics: Feminist Theories in Education

Block: Mon, 4:30 - 7:15 p.m.
Instructor: Freeden Oeur

Educational problems of interest and value to the individual student investigated under the supervision of a member of the department. Credit as arranged. Please see departmental website for specific details.
Recommendations: Open only to advanced students with permission of instructor.

ENG 0046-01 – Girls' Books

Block: Tue + Thurs, 1:30 - 2:45 p.m.
Instructor: Julia Genster

Introductory course on relationship between nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century novels, films and guides for girls and the changing constructions of the female subject. Topics include domesticity, sexuality, ethnicity, fantasy, and censorship. Readings may include works by Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Carolyn Keene, Louise Fitzhugh, Judy Blume, Katherine Paterson, Angela Johnson, Francesca Block, Carol Gilligan, and Michel Foucault.
Recommendations: ENG 1, 2 REQUIRED or Fulfillment of College Writing Requirement.

FAH 0092 – Special Topics Art and Activism after 1967
JS 0078-01 – Jewish Women

Block: Tue + Thurs, 3 - 4:15 p.m.
Instructor: Gloria Ascher

Images, experiences, and accomplishments of Jewish women in life, literature, and tradition from Biblical times to the present. Focus on individual women from various times and cultures; discussion of basic issues, present conditions, and prospects.

PHIL 0043 – Justice, Equality, And Liberty

Block: Mon + Wed, 3 - 4:15 p.m.
Instructor: David Denby

An introduction to the central concepts and problems in the foundations of political order, including the nature of the state, rights, justice, equality, representation, property, law, and coercion. Readings from classic and contemporary thinkers.

PHIL 0048 – Feminist Philosophy

Block: Mon + Wed, 10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
Instructor: TBA

Investigation of the implications of a feminist point of view for philosophical inquiry and for various philosophical issues. Practical ethical problems such as abortion, sexual harassment, and pornography, and theoretical issues such as the nature of equality and gender difference will be discussed. Core course in the Women's Studies Program.

PSY 0055 – Human Sexual Behavior

Block: Mon 9:30 - 10:20 a.m. + Tue, Thurs 10:30 - 11:20 a.m
Instructor: Joseph DeBold

A review of the psychology, physiology, and anatomy of sex with emphasis on human sexuality. Topics include embryogenesis and differentiation of sexual dimorphism, hormones and sexual behavior, cross-cultural studies of sexual behavior, heterosexual and homosexual scripts, contraception, sexual dysfunction, sex and the law, and pornography.
Recommendations: PSY 1 or junior or senior standing.

REL 0104-01 – Feminist Theologies

Block: Tue + Thurs, 1:30 - 2:45 p.m.
Instructor: Peggy Hutaff

Survey of feminism's impact on the religious commitments of women and on traditional religious institutions, beliefs, and practices. Feminist scholarship in the study of scriptural texts and other historical sources, the rise of women's rituals and alternative spiritualities, religious feminism in relation to other struggles for human dignity and liberation and how the inclusion of women's perspectives is influencing the craft of theology itself.

MUS 0045 – Queer Pop

Block: Tue + Thurs, 12:00 - 1:15 p.m.
Instructor: Stephan Pennington

A sociocultural exploration of the popular music that is by, about, or important to lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgendered and other queer people in the United States. In tandem with important moments in queer history, including early sexology, the Stonewall Riots and the AIDS Crisis, the course looks at a broad range of musicians and genres from Cole Porter to the Indigo Girls.

SOC 0149-06 – Selected Topics In Sociology: Sociology of Deviance

Block: Tue + Thurs, 1:30 - 2:45 p.m.
Instructor: Katherine Vecitis

This course examines the social construction of deviance in the United States, the processes of acquiring a deviant identity and managing deviant stigma, and the social organization of deviant acts, lifestyles, relationships, and careers. The overall goal of this course is to introduce and explore the concept of deviance, the methods by which sociologists learn about it, its theoretical underpinnings, and its causes and consequences. We will ask ourselves, “What constitutes deviance? How can we define it? Why do we define it in this way? Who defines it? Why does it exist? What are the consequences of deviance?” It will be easy to fall into discussions of criminal behavior but remember this: the violation of law is only one type of deviance. While discussions of criminal behavior are certainly important and relevant, we cannot understand the violation of law without first, or simultaneously, understanding the violation of social norms. As such, we will focus more so on understanding the power of social norms in governing (or controlling) people and their behavior, beliefs, lifestyles, and identities.

SOC 0149-07 – Selected Topics In Sociology Sexuality and Society

Block: Tue + Thurs, 4:30 - 5:45 p.m.
Instructor: TBA

Sexuality is fundamental to the cultural, economic, political, and social organization of all societies. This course considers the social determinants of sexuality. It examines the theoretical and methodological approaches used in sociological studies of sexuality including analyses of sexual meanings and identities, practices and behaviors, power and politics, and morality and social control. Issues may include social identities and relationships in regard to public policy.

Fall 2013

AMER 0180-01 Seminar: Queer Diasporas (cross-listed w/ English)

In 2000 David Eng published an article on Deann Borshay Liem's First Person Plural (2000) her documentary on her transracial, transnational adoption. Eng argued that it might be useful to think through diasporas "not in conventional terms of ethnic dispersion, filiation, and biological traceability, but rather in terms of queerness, affiliation, and social contingency." In this course we will do both: we will trace out new forms of contingent kinships and we will think through racial diasporas and the ways that some racialized groups have been positioned as always already queer in the spaces—through diasporic dispersal—that they have come to occupy. We may read and view work by Lorraine Hansberry, David Eng, Monique Truong, Piri Thomas, Cherrie Moraga, James Baldwin, Isaac Julien, W. E. B. DuBois, Dionne Brand, Jose Munoz, Cathy Cohen, Lisa Lowe, Jacqueline Goldsby, Robert Reid-Pharr, Gertrude Stein, Toni Morrison, Shane Vogel, Nella Larsen, Fae Myenne Ng, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, Claude McKay, & James Weldon Johnson. This course fulfills the post-1860 requirement.

AMER 0194-06 Special Topics: Performing America, Performing Identity (cross-listed with Drama)

An exploration of the images and identity politics of Americans presented on popular stages through written and verbal analysis of theatrical and critical texts from the 1830's to the present. Examination of American identity from the earliest theatrical and visual constructions of racial, gendered, cultural and national representations in American theatre by considering what it means to be an American. Perspective of playwrights, critics, scholars and artists from various underrepresented communities including but not limited to: Women, African Americans, Asian Americans, U.S. Latina/os, Native Americans, Immigrant populations, and LGBT.

ANTH27 Human Rights in Cultural Context

This gateway course examines anthropological debates about human rights. It introduces key anthropological methods, like participant observation, reflexivity, and cultural critique, and anthropological theories on topics like culture, the state, indigenous peoples, and globalization. We will analyze controversies about cultural relativism and universalism, approaches to both violent conflicts and the structural violence of poverty, and the relationship between anthropology and human rights. We also study ethnographies of human rights work that elucidate how advocates strive to produce reliable knowledge and circulate it to authorities and the public in reports, documentaries, and other media. This course counts toward the Social Sciences distribution requirement and the World Civilization requirement.

ANTH117 Coming of Age in Contemporary Africa

"The children of this land are old." (Wole Soyinka) Africa is the youngest continent in the world: most of its population is under 18. Yet despite being a demographic majority, young people in Africa are often regarded—and regard themselves—as a marginalized "minority." In this mid-level course, we examine the changing lives of children and youth in postcolonial Africa, approaching young people as cultural, political, and economic innovators. Topics include gendered challenges of becoming adult in contemporary Africa; globalization and transformations in sexuality; memory and cultural production; children and youth in war zones; young people's responses to the UN/NGO regime; and children's rights and citizenship in postcolonial states. We will explore these through ethnographies, novels, films, and music. This course counts toward the Social Sciences distribution requirement, the World Civilization requirement, the African Culture and Diasporas option, and the Anthropology area course requirement.

FAH0280-11 Seminar: Frida Kahlo

This seminar examines the art of the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, as well as Kahlo as a work of art, namely "Fridamania," or her global popular celebrity since her rediscovery in the 1970s. We will delve into the vast literature on Kahlo, including scholarly analysis, kids' books and her Internet cult following. We will ask what methods and approaches are fruitful for understanding one of the 20th-century's most celebrated artists and we will strive to understand her work more deeply in the context of the post-revolutionary Mexican "renaissance." We will explore how Kahlo drew on the rediscovery of popular art provincial painting, how she dealt with the politics of Mexican nationalism (including the reinvention of a usable past, as well as race, gender and class discourses), and how she meditated in her art work upon aspects of her personal life, including her intersecting identities and her marriage to one of Mexico's most important artists, Diego Rivera.

CHNS 112: Women and Gender in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture

Discussion from a gendered perspective of literary and other cultural texts produced since the early 20th century. Why have women and gender issues constituted an intrinsic part of modern Chinese history? How have men and women writers and intellectuals responded to China's modern challenges? How do we understand their responses? Taught in English

CH 109: Social Movements in Health

Health and illness can be an entirely private experience, but for many, health is social and political. A diagnosis can be a lightening rod, coping turns to action, and discovering the injustice that is at the root of a current or potential health threat results in participation in a movement for change. Movements are communities organizing to change the conditions, resource allocation, attitudes, language, laws, and even the science that disadvantages them. These social movements may be issue-based such as the food movement; disease-based such as the breast cancer movement; or population-based such as teens advocating for sex education in schools. In this course we explore the strategies and tactics of these movements with a focus on recent struggles in the United States. We will look at the goals, funding and organization, art and film, challenges to science and government, and motivations for action of several social movements, including 19th Century community health, occupational and environmental health, mental health, women's health, Community Health Centers, HIV/AIDS, medical marijuana, and the Tea Party movement against "Obamacare." Students will have the opportunity to engage with current movements through assignments and guest speakers.

DR43 Gay and Lesbian Theater and Film

Stage and media treatment of homosexuality throughout history, beginning with the classical Greek and Elizabethan stage, dealing with the Chinese and Japanese traditional drama, and proceeding to present time. Subjects include stage transvestism, stereotypes of the effete dandy and predatory lesbian, underground vs. commercial film representations, the concept of camps, AIDS drama, and contemporary queer theory and performance.  Film screenings.

ED 166: Masculinities in Urban Schooling

This seminar addresses issues of masculinity in schooling through narrative, ethnographic, and sociological analyses. We will frame this investigation through the intersecting lenses of race, class, and sexuality. Specifically, we will explore these intersections in the context of urban schooling, engaging schools as socio-cultural institutions that reflect, mediate, and reinforce larger structures and processes of masculinity. Students will engage both feminist theoretical and empirical bodies of literature and develop a complex understanding of the issues facing scholars, students and school communities broadly conceived. Topics will include: masculinities and music, media, family, athletics, the juvenile justice system, and classrooms.

ENG 0080-01 Hitchcock: Cinema, Gender, Ideology

Alfred Hitchcock: the name is synonymous not only with cinematic suspense, but also with the appeal of film as, at once, a medium of popular entertainment and the distinctive art form of the twentieth century. Hitchcock's undiminished appeal reflects our continuing fascination with the visual satisfactions that cinema affords while speaking to our ongoing cultural investment in the narrative forms (thriller, suspense film, romantic melodrama) in which Hitchcock primarily worked. This course will explore the relation between Hitchcock's achievement of cinematic "mastery" and his constant, even obsessive, attention to questions of gender, sexuality, and socio-cultural authority–questions that always underlie his narrative suspense. We will examine how "seeing" in Hitchcock's films is the join between politics and erotics, inflecting cinematic spectatorship in the direction of such erotic (and political) "perversions" as voyeurism, fetishism, sadism, and masochism—"perversions" that find expression in the style of Hitchcock's films themselves. With this in mind we will consider the pleasures that Hitchcock's style affords: Whose pleasure is it? To what does it respond? How does its insistent perversity affect our reading of Hitchcock's appeal? We'll try to answer these questions by reading various essays on Hitchcock's cinema, including recent interventions from the perspectives of psychoanalysis, feminism, and queer theory. Our energies will be devoted primarily, however, to studying some of the most complex, compelling, and influential texts in cinematic history. These will include The 39 Steps, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Notorious, Rope, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, and The Birds. Students will be encouraged to attend showings of the films on the library's large screen in Tisch 304, but they will be permitted to watch the movies on their own (before the day of class discussion, of course) if they cannot make the weekly screenings. This course fulfills the post-1860 requirement.

FR 162: French Romanticism: "Masculin/Feminin"

This seminar addresses issues of masculinity in schooling through narrative, ethnographic, and sociological analyses. We will frame this investigation through the intersecting lenses of race, class, and sexuality. Specifically, we will explore these intersections in the context of urban schooling, engaging schools as socio-cultural institutions that reflect, mediate, and reinforce larger structures and processes of masculinity. Students will engage both feminist theoretical and empirical bodies of literature and develop a complex understanding of the issues facing scholars, students and school communities broadly conceived. Topics will include: masculinities and music, media, family, athletics, the juvenile justice system, and classrooms.

HIST 91: African Foundation Seminar: Seeking Gendered Perspectives

This course addresses the historiography, theory and methods of African history with special attention to women, men, youth and children in Southern Africa We will survey themes around gender, sexuality, labor, culture, age, urban society and politics, and engage theoretical analyses of Southern Africa's recent past. Course materials include scholarly readings, documentary films, photographs, literature, poetry, interviews and a range of digital, print and object primary sources including: ALUKA digital archive, "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa," and Michigan State University's "African Activist Archive Project." Course counts for World Civilization Requirement, Entryway for Africana, History & Int'l Relations fields.

HIST 196: Body and Sexuality in Pre-Modern Europe

A research seminar examining the history of the body, sex difference, and sexuality in the period between 1200-1800. The first weeks will be spent establishing both the historical context and the main historiographical debates. How do bodies change through history? To what extent are ideas of the body linked to ideas of medicine and anatomy? How were different kinds of sexuality viewed? Is sexuality even a useful term to use when examining the past? How are the body and sexuality linked? The historical context you gain from the readings and discussions regarding these questions will aid you in the main goal of the course, which is to write a ~25pp research paper. The papers will be done in a number of steps, all of which will be graded. Topics must be chosen quite early in the semester, and the first few weeks will focus heavily on research methods in addition to the readings. We will take class trips to visit the rare book collections at Tisch Special Collections and Harvard's Houghton Library, and we will have ample time for guided research as students hunt for topics. Students will give class presentations of their papers at the end of the semester.

HIST 196: Misogyny and Patriarchy in 1100-1700

Though misogyny and patriarchy have characterized European society for most of its history, it would appear that both intensified in the period just before the rise of the modern nation-state. This seminar will investigate that hypothesis, with an eye to determining its validity and discovering what such a phenomenon might have meant in the real lives of the European people.

HIST 36: Communities and Diversity in US Social History

The historical construction of U. S. democratic pluralism in a civil society of diverse communities including comparisons with pluralism in other countries. Ethnicity, class, gender, race, nationalism, regionalism, religion, consumerism, and popular media in this process.

PS 188-03: Gender Issues in World Politics

This seminar addresses issues of masculinity in schooling through narrative, ethnographic, and sociological analyses. We will frame this investigation through the intersecting lenses of race, class, and sexuality. Specifically, we will explore these intersections in the context of urban schooling, engaging schools as socio-cultural institutions that reflect, mediate, and reinforce larger structures and processes of masculinity. Students will engage both feminist theoretical and empirical bodies of literature and develop a complex understanding of the issues facing scholars, students and school communities broadly conceived. Topics will include: masculinities and music, media, family, athletics, the juvenile justice system, and classrooms.

SOC 30: Sex and Gender in Society

Differences and inequalities between women's and men's social positions and personal experiences in the contemporary United States. Intersections of gender, race, and class. Gender relations in the labor force, families, the state, and in sexual and emotional life. Violence and sexual harassment. Men's and women's efforts toward personal and social change in gender relations.

SOC 188-02: AIDS: Social Origins, Global Consequences

Explores the emergence, meaning and effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic at different historical moments and in different continents and nations. We will use the formidable challenges it poses to global health initiatives, to security and to economic survival in many regions as a prism through which to study the capacity of societies to mobilize collective resources. Topics may include: analysis of how/whether scientific and epidemiological information is factored into policy decisions; how the disease and people living with it acquire varying identities in different cultures. In addition to the scholarly and scientific literature, we will read some core texts illuminating various facets of the epidemic (may include: The Origins of AIDS by Jacques Pepin, Randy Shilts And The Band Plays On, Tony Barnett and Alan Whiteside, AIDS in the Twenty-First Century). These will be supplemented by the representations of AIDS that have appeared over time in novels, films and art that allow us to understand better its effects on different societies.

WGSS 73: Introduction to Queer Studies

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies through an examination of key texts and practices. Course will interrogate notions of normality; binary systems of sex, gender, and sexuality; and cultural representations of personhood, citizenship, and family. It will examine the application of queer theory in fields such as economics, anthropology, literature, cultural studies, and film studies. Of particular concern will be ways gender and sexuality intersect with race, ethnicity, nationality, and class.

2012 - 13 Courses

Spring 2013

AMER 180-04 – CULTURE & INEQUALITY

The kinds of music people prefer, the ways they dress, their discourses around "proper" feminine behavior, and the like help explain how groups create and challenge hierarchies between one another. Much of the social and economic inequality between groups takes place through the cultural realm. How groups are read culturally and how they interact with others is key to the social construction of group differences and hierarchies. This course examines how inequality is shaped by the symbolic boundaries groups draw between one another and the interpretations groups make of other groups. The course examines how everyday cultural practices and ideologies relate to individuals' structural and cultural surroundings, such as residential segregation, dominant stereotypes of minority groups, and the like. This course will focus on racial, gender, and sexuality hierarchies. The coursework will culminate in a research paper.

AMER 194-03 – SPECIAL TOPICS: THE LATINO PRESENCE IN ART AND VISUAL CULTURE

Representations of Latinos and by Latinos across a broad range of media, with emphasis on contemporary art and film/television, but including literature and music. Popularity and increase of Latino culture in the U.S. in the context of ongoing debates about immigration, national security, and shifting demographics. Key topics include the cultural politics of representation, the relationship of contemporary Latino artists to the mainstream art world, debates about visual art as a vehicle for the expression of cultural identity, the role of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity in creative expression, the relationship between Latino culture and the mainstream, the diversity of the Latino community, how self-representation informs political dissent, and an examination of Latinidad as an affirmative cultural construction for people of Latin American descent in the U.S. No prerequisites. (May be taken at the 100-level.)

CLS 110 – WOMEN OF BYZANTIUM

Examination of the themes of political legitimacy, spirituality, education, gender roles, the spread of Byzantine culture, and the evolution of Christian theology through a careful study of the lives of various women of the Byzantine world. This will include examination of the lives of women of the Byzantine Empire, Southeastern Europe, Russia, Western Europe, the kingdoms of Armenia and the Ottoman Empire.

DR 43 – GAY AND LESBIAN THEATRE AND FILM

Stage and media treatment of homosexuality throughout history, beginning with the classical Greek and Elizabethan stages, dealing with the Chinese and Japanese traditional drama, and proceeding to the present time. Subjects include stage transvestism, stereotypes of the effete dandy and predatory lesbian, underground vs. commercial film representations, the concept of camp, AIDS drama, and contemporary queer theory and performance. (May be taken at 100-level for graduate credit with consent.)

DR 46 – INTERNATIONAL WOMEN FILM DIRECTORS

Although female directors are still considered a minority in the international film industry, their contribution is significant. The films that we will screen are not Hollywood studio films and do not cater to predictable conventions and "happy endings." These films are diverse and unique, yet share such themes as female oppression, gender identification, women's roles in everyday life, and female empowerment. We will analyze the director's' narrative and visual storytelling processes and choices, and how their diverse backgrounds influence their films, as well as discuss critics' reviews. Many of these provocative directors have been imprisoned, banned from their countries, are a major influence on their country's New Wave cinema, and/or stirred and international debate because of their films.

ED 162 – CLASS, RACE, GENDER IN HISTORY OF U.S. EDUCATION

History of education in the United States as a struggle over access and control. Relation to class reproduction, social mobility, the maintenance of and resistance to racial boundaries and gender issues, emphasizing the struggles of disempowered groups to gain access to schooling in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

ENG 46 – GIRL'S BOOKS

Introductory course on relationship between nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century novels, films and guides for girls and the changing constructions of the female subject. Topics include domesticity, sexuality, ethnicity, fantasy, and censorship. Readings may include works by Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Carolyn Keene, Louise Fitzhugh, Judy Blume, Katherine Paterson, Angela Johnson, Francesca Block, Carol Gilligan, and Michel Foucault.

ENG 192-01 – SEMINAR: HOME IS WHERE THE HATRED IS

This seminar draws its title from Gil Scott-Heron's song of the same name (sampled by Kanye West in "My Way Home") and its focus is on productions by and "about" the North American African diaspora. We will think about the relations/tensions/dimensions of "home" and "hatred" as we think about ways that people and places are produced, made and unmade and ways that violent histories are re-imagined, redeployed, made anew.  Readings, viewings and listenings may include: Gil-Scott Heron, Toni Morrison, Dionne Brand, Steve Erickson, Ralph Ellison, Andrea Lee, Fred Moten, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Gwendolyn Brooks, and others.  This course is a seminar and your engaged participation is required. This course fulfills the post-1860 requirement.

PJS 111 / SOC 111 – MAKING SOCIAL CHANGE HAPPEN

Social change and social justice work often begins at the local level. Struggles by workers, racial-ethnic groups, women, immigrants, low income people, and others started in local communities. This course focuses on theories and practices of community-based activism and local grassroots organizing. Why and how do people organize? What are the limits and potential of grassroots organizing? How do grassroots efforts connect to larger social change and to politics?

PJS 130 / SOC 130 – WEALTH, POVERTY, AND INEQUALITY

Socioeconomic class in U.S. with some global comparison. Intersections with race and gender. Social analysis of distribution of economic, social, political resources. Alternative visions and strategies for change. Opportunity for field placements in local community organizations.

PJS 150-06 – SPECIAL TOPICS: GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

REL 104 – FEMINIST THEOLOGIES
Survey of feminism's impact on the religious commitments of women and on traditional religious institutions, beliefs, and practices. Feminist scholarship in the study of scriptural texts and other historical sources, the rise of women's rituals and alternative spiritualities, religious feminism in relation to other struggles for human dignity and liberation and how the inclusion of women's perspectives is influencing the craft of theology itself.

SOC 20 – FAMILY AND INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS

Understanding the contemporary American family, defined broadly as those with whom one shares resources and values and to whom one has a long-term commitment. Topics include historical and cross-cultural variations, dating and romantic love, cohabitation and marriage, parenting, family roles of men and women, divorce and family stability, and the future of the family.

SOC 149-06 – SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE

This course examines the social construction of deviance in the United States, the processes of acquiring a deviant identity and managing deviant stigma, and the social organization of deviant acts, lifestyles, relationships, and careers. The overall goal of this course is to introduce and explore the concept of deviance, the methods by which sociologists learn about it, its theoretical underpinnings, and its causes and consequences. We will ask ourselves, “What constitutes deviance? How can we define it? Why do we define it in this way? Who defines it? Why does it exist? What are the consequences of deviance?” It will be easy to fall into discussions of criminal behavior but remember this: the violation of law is only one type of deviance. While discussions of criminal behavior are certainly important and relevant, we cannot understand the violation of law without first, or simultaneously, understanding the violation of social norms. As such, we will focus more so on understanding the power of social norms in governing (or controlling) people and their behavior, beliefs, lifestyles, and identities.

SOC 149-07 – SEXUALITY AND SOCIETY

Sexuality is fundamental to the cultural, economic, political, and social organization of all societies. This course considers the social determinants of sexuality.  It examines the theoretical and methodological approaches used in sociological studies of sexuality including analyses of sexual meanings and identities, practices and behaviors, power and politics, and morality and social control. Issues may include social identities and relationships in regard to public policy.

WS 85-02 – POST-STONEWALL LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Fall 2012

AMER 018001 - BLACK FEMINIST THEORIES

0 Sharpe, Christi 1.0 Completion Of College Writ
Req./clst Eng
019103
03872

ANTH 014919 - SEXUALITY & GENDER SOUTH ASIA

D+ Pinto, Sarah 1.0 Do Not Register
If You Have Completed Anth120
03641

ENG 0045 - NONWESTERN WOMEN WRITERS

An introduction to post-World War II women authors from the non-West, a problematic term used here as a starting point for discussion about the impact of colonization and the effects of decolonization on the social and political construction of women as a category. Writers include Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, Buchi Emecheta, Mahasweta Debi, Anita Desai, and Nawal al-Saadawi.
Sections
Prerequisites: ENG 1, 2 REQUIRED or Fulfillment of College Writing Requirement.
ENG 004501 E+MW Roy, Modhumita 1.0 Completion Of College Writing Requirement

ENG 029101 - QUEER THEORY

5+ Edelman, Lee C 1.0 Grad Stand In
Tufts Eng Or Perm Of Inst 01718

EXP-0045-F - Gender, Culture, and Human Rights

1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04129
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202
How are international human rights standards gendered? What is the difference between women's human rights and men's human rights? What role does culture play in our conception of human rights? This course examines past and current human rights issues that focus on gender, including changing conceptions of human rights. We will examine gendered human rights in contexts including human trafficking, property rights, economics and physical security, as well as several country-specific case studies (South Africa, Sweden and the United States). Students in this class will develop a solid foundation in international issues grounded in gendered human rights concerns.

Jenna DiCocco is an attorney, teacher and human rights advocate. She is a Visiting Scholar at Northeastern University's Women's Gender & Sexuality Studies Program where she is researching the gendered application of certain criminal law mitigation factors in spousal murder cases. She also writes and publishes the weekly Human Rights RoundUp, a news aggregation blog highlighting current global human rights issues.

EXP-0047-F: Love, Law, and the State: The Evolving Right to Marry

1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04130
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 006
What do the current legislative and judicial battles over same-sex marriage tell us about marriage as an institution? Through the lens of the marriage equality movement – including the current litigation over California's Proposition 8 and the Federal Defense of Marriage Act – this course will explore the evolution of the legal right of marriage in the United States. We will look at the current national and state movements, including the distinction between the right to marry and the marriage equality movements, and the practical considerations for each. We will trace the development of the concept of marriage as both a state-created institution and a judicially recognized fundamental right, and we will explore how, historically, courts and legislatures have extended marriage to previously excluded groups. We will also critically examine the limits of that expansion. And we will consider such questions as: Why do some states permit same-sex marriage while others pass constitutional amendments prohibiting same-sex couples to marry? And why does the law continue to draw the line at polygamy, marriage between cousins, and marriage between minors? In this highly interactive class, students will have the opportunity to work with primary and secondary legal sources, learn from visiting experts and present their own written and oral arguments.

Emily Cardy is a staff appellate attorney at the Committee for Public Counsel Services, the Commonwealth's public defense agency. After graduating from the Boston University School of Law, she served as law clerk to the Honorable Charles B. Day, United States Magistrate Judge for the District of Maryland. Emily then returned to Boston and served as law clerk to the Honorable James McHugh, Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court.

Ari Kristan is an Assistant Attorney General in the Office of Attorney General Martha Coakley. After graduation from Boston University School of Law, she served as a law clerk to the Honorable Joette Katz, Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court.

HIST0155 - WOM/GEN/FAMILY 1200-1800

Social and cultural history of gender and family in Europe from the late Middle Ages through the Enlightenment. Ideas about women and men in the Renaissance, the importance of marriage in early modern social and economic life. Other topics include gender roles in urban, rural, and courtly households; the Protestant Reformation's effects on marriage and family; childbearing and childhood; female monarchs; women and education; witchcraft; and the family as a model for the early modern state. We also consider the social position of individuals outside of the 'normal' family unit, such as widows, orphans, monks, and nuns. Throughout the course we will explore shifting expectations of women, men, and the family in early modern European society.
Sections
03725 HIST015517 E+MW Rankin, Alisha 1.0

PHIL0048 - FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY

Investigation of the implications of a feminist point of view for philosophical inquiry and for various philosophical issues. Practical ethical problems such as abortion, sexual harassment, and pornography, and theoretical issues such as the nature of equality and gender difference will be discussed. Core course in the Women's Studies Program.
Sections
02737 PHIL004801 J+ Staff 1.0

SOC 0030 - SEX & GENDER IN SOCIETY

Differences and inequalities between women's and men's social positions and personal experiences in the contemporary United States. Intersections of gender, race, and class. Gender relations in the labor force, families, the state, and in sexual and emotional life. Violence and sexual harassment. Men's and women's efforts toward personal and
social change in gender relations.
Sections
03168 SOC 003001 E+MW Vecitis, Kather 1.0

WS 0073 - INTRO TO QUEER STUDIES

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies through an examination of key texts and practices. Course will interrogate notions of normality; binary systems of sex, gender, and sexuality; and cultural representations of personhood, citizenship and family. It will examine the application of queer theory in fields such as economics, anthropology, literature, cultural studies, and film studies. Of particular concern will be ways gender and sexuality intersect with race, ethnicity, nationality, and class.
Sections
03438 WS 007301 L+ Staff 1.0

WS 0190 - DOING FEMINIST RESEARCH

Practices and methods of feminist interdisciplinary research in a
cross-cultural framework. How feminist inquiry rethinks disciplinary
assumptions and categories; what counts as knowledge; relation
between subjects and objects of study; international issues in feminist
analysis. To be taken in preparation for senior project. Required of all
majors and minors.
Sections
WS 019001 7+ Pinto, Sarah 1.0 Perm Of Instrctor/required Of All WS Majors & Minors

2011 - 12 Courses

Spring 2012

ANTH0117 - CHILDREN & YOUTH AFRICA

Examination of the changing lives of children and youth in postcolonial Africa, approaching young people as cultural, political, and economic innovators. Topics include gendered challenges of becoming an adult in contemporary Africa; globalization and transformations in sexuality; memory and cultural production; children and youth in war zones; young people's responses to UN/NGOs; children's rights and citizenship in postcolonial states.

CLS 0158 - WOMEN GREEK MYTHOLOGY

Study of legendary and mythical female figures with emphasis on identifying characterizations and roles for these figures and assessment of how their representation enhances female stature, as it informs and supports cultural identity at various historical times. Exploration of how ancient authors and artists represent the female experience generally: matriarchy, misogyny, martyrdom, marriage, gender-specific cults, athletics, and election in various vocations.

ED 0161 - SOCIOLOGY OF SCHOOL

Educational institutions as social systems and the various external and internal social forces that shape them. Representative ethnographic studies of schooling with an emphasis on ethnicity, class, and gender as organizing categories of student experience and school social organization.

ED 0166 - MASCULINITIES/URBAN SCHL

This seminar is an introduction to social science theories and qualitative studies of masculinities in urban schooling. Themes of race, class, and sexuality and topics such as media, family, athletics, immigration, and the juvenile justice system as they relate to school policy, classroom practice, and urban social policy.

ENG 0046 - GIRLS' BOOKS

Introductory course on relationship between nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century novels, films and guides for girls and the changing constructions of the female subject. Topics include domesticity, sexuality, ethnicity, fantasy, and censorship. Readings may include works by Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Carolyn Keene, Louise Fitzhugh, Judy Blume, Katherine Paterson, Angela Johnson, Francesca Block, Carol Gilligan, and Michel Foucault.

ENG 0160 - ENV JUSTICE & U.S. LIT

(Cross-listed as ENV 160 and PJS 160). An examination of contemporary multicultural U.S. literature in relation to environmental justice concerns. Works by Helena María Viramontes, Gloria Naylor, Karen Tei Yamashita, Simon Ortiz, Annie Proulx, with particular attention to issues of environmental racism, ecofeminism, homophobia and the social construction of nature, U.S. environmental imperialism, and urban ecologies. Emphasis on the role of literature and the arts in social change, including practical strategies for activism.

ENG 0177 - FEMINISM, LIT, THEORY

Readings in feminist approaches to questions of gender, representation, and difference from Wollstonecraft to contemporary theory, including literary, psychoanalytic, social, sexuality, and critical race studies.

GER 0092 - SPECIAL TOPICS: German Literature and Sexuality.
EXP-0005-S: GAGA's HOLY MONSTERS

1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04818
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 05
Through in-depth analysis of her musical, textual and visual aesthetics, this course will explore Lady Gaga's work as represented mainly by her music videos in relation to the implications for gender and sexuality. This course will investigate how her work draws on Christian ideas and practices to frame her commentary on issues of gender and sexuality, and how such appropriations may yield positive and/or negative effects.

Emmanuel Hernandez is a senior at Tufts University working towards a double major in Religion and Music. He has developed an approach to balancing high theory with practical application by writing and presenting on popular music icons such as Lady Gaga and Rihanna within the context of queer theory.

EXP-0037-S: GAY AND LESBIAN MOVEMENTS: ASSIMILATION, LIBERATION, AND THE RISE OF IDENTITY POLITICS

1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04838
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Tisch 310
Will GLBT people ever be able to achieve genuine equality with the rest of America? Throughout its relatively short history, the gay and lesbian movement in the United States has endured searing internal conflicts over whether to embrace assimilationist or liberationist strategies. This ideological struggle between these two positions has been a source of bitter resentment and division from its revolutionary inception, essentially destroying any sense of political unity and now "virtual equality" seems to represent the limits of mainstreaming. "Virtual equality" means that GLBT people enjoy access to power, but no real power; can pay taxes, but not expect the government to protect them; can be visible, but vulnerable to discrimination and violence. From this long struggle came identity politics. Using texts, law, politics, history, psychology, religion, films, theater, and literature, this inter-disciplinary course will historically explore the struggles that challenged, shaped, defined and ultimately determined the direction the gay and lesbian social movement would take and its current consequences.

This class has been approved by the History Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement.
It has also been approved by the Women's Studies program to count toward major credit.

Bert Ouelette was doing his pastoral care residency at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York during the early and mid-eighties when AIDS was devastating the gay male community. A few years later he wrote his doctoral dissertation on the life span of social movements using gay and lesbian movements as an example, and he has conducted over eighty interviews with people who have lived the history. He is an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Emmanuel College and has two Masters degrees from Boston College (one in Comparative Literature and the other in Developmental Psychology) and a PhD in Law, Policy and Society from Northeastern University.

JPN 0114 - GENDER IN JPN CULTURE

The role of femininity and masculinity in Japanese culture, from the writings of Murasaki Shikibu, creator of "The Tale of Genji" to the heroines of contemporary Japanese animation (anime). Our sources will include, literature, film, essays, television series, manga (comics) and anime. The role of women as a repository of tradition, the use of women in contemporary horror films, the rise and fall of the iconic salaryman, the crisis in contemporary masculinity, and issues in queer sexuality. Taught in English.

JS 0078 - JEWISH WOMEN

(Cross-listed as REL 78.) Images, experiences, and accomplishments of Jewish women in life, literature, and tradition from Biblical times to the present. Focus on individual women from various times and cultures; discussion of basic issues, present conditions, and prospects

NUTR0222 - GEND, CULT & CONF HU EMER

(Cross-listed as DHP D232 -Fletcher). This course will examine humanitarian aid in conflict situations from a gender perspective and highlight the policy and program implications that this dimension presents. Topics covered will include the ways in which gender relations are affected by conflict; the relationship between gender and the militarization of societies and communities; violations of human rights and women's rights; women in peace building and conflict resolution; the gender dynamics of aid and post-conflict reconstruction. This course was formerly listed as NUTR 261.

PS 0128 - GENDER, WORK & POL E ASIA

Gendered experiences of work in the East Asian economic "miracle." The state's role in creating, challenging, or mitigating gender considerations in work, the centrality of women's labor in development, and women's work as an international relations issue. Readings on factory, office, domestic, and sex work.

PS 0130 - SEM: AFRICAN POL ECONOMY

Theories of political economy with a focus on political liberalization and economic change. Issues include political reform, economic development, gender and sex roles, agricultural policy, debt, poverty, structural adjustment, and emerging African markets.

PSY 0055 - HUMAN SEXUAL BEHAVIOR

A review of the psychology, physiology, and anatomy of sex with emphasis on human sexuality. Topics include embryogenesis and differentiation of sexual dimorphism, hormones and sexual behavior, cross-cultural studies of sexual behavior, heterosexual and homosexual scripts, contraception, sexual dysfunction, sex and the law, and pornography.

REL 0104 - FEMINIST THEOLOGIES

Survey of feminism's impact on the religious commitments of women and on traditional religious institutions, beliefs, and practices. Feminist scholarship in the study of scriptural texts and other historical sources, the rise of women's rituals and alternative spiritualities, religious feminism in relation to other struggles for human dignity and liberation and how the inclusion of women's perspectives is influencing the craft of theology itself.

REL 106 - CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS THOUGHT

What does the "separation of church and state" mean for the role of religion in U.S. public life? What is the proper relationship between religion and politics? How do religious thinkers address contemporary debates about the war on terrorism, racism, sexism, abortion and homosexuality? Is religion a problem or a resource? This semester "Contemporary Religious Thought" will explore representative positions concerning the relationship of religion and American public life and focusing on the topics of violence and sexuality. Exploring religion as both a problem and a resource in U.S. public life, the course aims to foster students' capacity to discuss and analyze selected religious/political/social issues. This course counts toward the Humanities distribution requirement.

RUS 0072 - CONTEMP RUSSIAN CULTURE

Exploration of Russian culture through literature, film, the media, and the arts from the era of "stagnation" to glasnost, perestroika, and the post-Soviet period. The destruction and reconstruction of cultural and political canons and myths: the Stalinist legacy and reevaluation of Soviet history; the revival of religion and nationalism; social dislocation: the problems of youth, the generation gap, and women's issues; the breaking of taboos and the dark side of freedom--violence, crime, pornography, and neofascism; the liberalization and commercialization of art. All readings and films are in English.

SOC 01490 - SEXUALITY AND SOCIETY
UEP 0215 - LEGAL FRAMEWRKS SOC POL

Provides students with a legal foundation for understanding the connections between social policy and individual rights. Examines the legal tools available to ensure justice in America, including the U.S. Constitution, pivotal court decisions, and landmark legislation such as the Civil Rights Act, the Fair Housing Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Course touches on issues of race, gender, national origin, and sexual orientation, among other themes.

Fall 2011

AMER019402 - Special Topics: American Women Writers

Courses offered on an ad hoc basis and open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Please see departmental website for specific details.

ANTH0027 - Human Rights and Culture

This gateway course examines anthropological debates about human rights. It introduces key anthropological methods, like participant-observation, reflexivity, and cultural critique, and anthropological theories on topics like culture, the state, indigenous peoples, and globalization. We will analyze controversies about cultural relativism and universalism, approaches to both violent conflicts and the structural violence of poverty, and the relationship between anthropology and human rights. We also study ethnographies of human rights work that elucidate how advocates strive to produce reliable knowledge and circulate it to authorities and the public in reports, documentaries, and other media.

ANTH0148 - Medical Anthropology

Cultural models of illness, health, deviance, and normality. Institutions of medicine and healing in non-Western contexts and in the contemporary U.S. Using a critical medical anthropological approach, special topics (such as AIDS, madness, and gender-related concerns) will be explored.

CD0064 - Parent Child Relations

Examines the parent-child relationship from a variety of perspectives, including cross-cultural and social class differences, differences between mothering and fathering, and the parents' influence on the child's psychological development (e.g., sex role). Emphasis is on the interactive influences of parents and children. In the last part of the course, programs for altering parent-child interactions are explored. While most of the readings are based on recent empirical studies, the course includes short stories and novels. Case histories are also relied on to capture complex, intangible phenomena like communication, trust, and intimacy.

CH0106 - Health, Ethics, and Policy

Critical exploration of the ethical dimensions of public health policy and practice. Ethical analyses of health promotion, epidemiological research, surveillance, and health-care services in dealing with particular health concerns (e.g., smoking, violence, HIV/AIDS, and managed care).

CH108 - Epidemics

(Cross-listed as Sociology 108.) Origins, epidemiology, and evolution of epidemics, rooted in biology, behavior, social organization, culture, and political economy. Societies' efforts to contain diseases, their effects on world history, and their cultural record in literature and contemporary sources. Cases range from early plagues (syphilis, smallpox, bubonic plague) and the recurrent threats of influenza, malaria, and tuberculosis, to nineteenth-century famines, and modern scourges such as the global challenge of AIDS.

HIST104 - Gender/Travel/Imperialism

Female pirates, prisoners and slaves, missionaries, aristocrats, ambassadors' wives, and tourists from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. The domestication of empire, the transformation of gender, race, class, and family in expatriate life, and the construction of new social roles in exile. Women as "honorary males," cross-dressing, the female gaze, and views of race and identity in travel writing by women. The role of European women in producing imperial discourse and in building empire.

HIST0126 - Religion & US Politics

(Cross listed as Religion 42). The role of religion in shaping American civic engagement and political activity from the seventeenth century to the present, putting contemporary events in broader historical context. Topics and themes may include: the relationship between church and state in the colonial period; faith and the founders; religion and social activism in the antebellum era (especially anti-slavery and women's rights); religion, race and Civil Rights; religious "outsiders" and American politics; spirituality and social protest in the 20th century; the rise of the religious right; religion and American politics post-9/11.

PHIL0043 - Justice, Equality & Liberty

(Cross-listed as Political Science 43.) An introduction to the central concepts and problems in the foundations of political order, including the nature of the state, rights, justice, equality, representation, property, law, and coercion. Readings from classic and contemporary thinkers.

PHIL0048 - Feminist Philosophy

Investigation of the implications of a feminist point of view for philosophical inquiry and for various philosophical issues. Practical ethical problems such as abortion, sexual harassment, and pornography, and theoretical issues such as the nature of equality and gender difference will be discussed. Core course in the Women's Studies Program.

PSY0013 - Social Psychology

How situations and the people around us influence our thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Aggression, attitudes, attraction, attribution, conformity, group processes, helping behavior, non-verbal behavior, self-knowledge, social cognition, social influence, and stereotypes and prejudice. Applications of social psychological concepts to topics such as health, intergroup relations, and law.

SOC0030 - Sex & Gender in Society

Differences and inequalities between women's and men's social positions and personal experiences in the contemporary United States. Intersections of gender, race, and class. Gender relations in the labor force, families, the state, and in sexual and emotional life. Violence and sexual harassment. Men's and women's efforts toward personal and social change in gender relations.

SOC0040 - Media & Society

Social and economic organization of the mass media of communication. Effects on content. Themes of mass culture. Social composition of the audience. Effects of the media on the audience. Topics such as television, films, the press, books, magazines, and advertising.

SOC0135 - Social Movements

(Cross-listed as Peace and Justice Studies 135.) Social circumstances under which organized efforts by powerless groups of people to affect history are attempted, motivations for such efforts, processes by which such efforts are implemented and controlled, and the impact such efforts have on society. Major sociological perspectives on social movements. Selected use of films to illustrate major themes.

WS0073 - Intro to Queer Studies

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies through an examination of key texts and practices. Course will interrogate notions of normality; binary systems of sex, gender, and sexuality; and cultural representations of personhood, citizenship and family. It will examine the application of queer theory in fields such as economics, anthropology, literature, cultural studies, and film studies. Of particular concern will be ways gender and sexuality intersect with race, ethnicity, nationality, and class.

2010 - 11 Courses

Spring 2011

AMER 0065 - AMERICAN FILM STUDIES: WOMEN AT WAR

Changing topics in American cinema with an emphasis on examining technical film properties, determinants of national and international film distribution, and issues relating to race, ethnicity, gender, and class.

ANTH0148 - MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Cultural models of illness, health, deviance, and normality. Institutions of medicine and healing in non-Western contexts and in the contemporary U.S. Using a critical medical anthropological approach, special topics (such as AIDS, madness, and gender-related concerns) will be explored.

DR 0043 - GAY AND LESBIAN THEATRE AND FILM

Stage and media treatment of homosexuality throughout history, beginning with the classical Greek and Elizabethan stages, dealing with the Chinese and Japanese traditional drama, and proceeding to the present time. Subjects include stage transvestism, stereotypes of the effete dandy and predatory lesbian, underground vs. commercial film representations, the concept of camp, AIDS drama, and contemporary queer theory and performance. (May be taken at 100-level for graduate credit with consent.)

DR 0046 - INTERNATIONAL WOMEN FILM DIRECTORS

Although female directors are still considered a minority in the international film industry, their contribution is significant. The films that we will screen are not Hollywood studio films and do not cater to predictable conventions and "happy endings." These films are diverse and unique, yet share such themes as female oppression, gender identification, women's roles in everyday life, and female empowerment. We will analyze the director's' narrative and visual storytelling processes and choices, and how their diverse backgrounds influence their films, as well as discuss critics' reviews. Many of these provocative directors have been imprisoned, banned from their countries, are a major influence on their country's New Wave cinema, and/or stirred and international debate because of their films.

HIST0155 - WOMEN, GENDER AND FAMILY, 1200-1800

Social and cultural history of gender and family in from the late Middle Ages through the Enlightenment. Ideas about women and men in the Renaissance, the importance of marriage in early modern social and economic life. Other topics include gender roles in urban, rural, and courtly households; the Protestant Reformation's effects on marriage and family; childbearing and childhood; female monarchs; women and education; witchcraft; and the family as a model for the early modern state. We also consider the social position of individuals outside of the 'normal' family unit, such as widows, orphans, monks, and nuns. Throughout the course we will explore shifting expectations of women, men, and the family in early modern European society.

MUS 0097 - SPECIAL TOPICS: QUEER POP

Study and research in a course involving one or more of the following: music history, composition, ethnomusicology, music theory. Please see departmental website for specific details. Does not count toward the Music major.

MUS 0185STUDIES IN WOMEN & MUSIC

Selected topics concerning women in music. Intended for advanced music majors and graduate students.

PHIL 0141 - GLOBAL JUSTICE

(Cross-listed as Peace and Justice Studies 141.)
A philosophical study of justice in a global context. Topics selected from the following: nationalism, identity and group rights, political resistance and revolution, the conduct of war, human rights and duties of aid, population control, and environmental justice. Theoretical discussions of cultural pluralism and the requirements of justice, universalism vs. relativism, and the limits of partiality.

PSY 0055 - HUMAN SEXUAL BEHAVIOR

A review of the psychology, physiology, and anatomy of sex with emphasis on human sexuality. Topics include embryogenesis and differentiation of sexual dimorphism, hormones and sexual behavior, cross-cultural studies of sexual behavior, heterosexual and homosexual scripts, contraception, sexual dysfunction, sex and the law, and pornography.

SOC 0020 - FAMILY AND INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS

Understanding the contemporary American family, defined broadly as those with whom one shares resources and values and to whom one has a long-term commitment. Topics include historical and cross-cultural variations, dating and romantic love, cohabitation and marriage, parenting, family roles of men and women, divorce and family stability, and the future of the family.

SOC 0135 - SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

(Cross-listed as Peace and Justice Studies 135.)
Social circumstances under which organized efforts by powerless groups of people to affect history are attempted, motivations for such efforts, processes by which such efforts are implemented and controlled, and the impact such efforts have on society. Major sociological perspectives on social movements. Selected use of films to illustrate major themes.

WS 0072 - INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN STUDIES

Historic and emergent developments in the field of women's studies, with emphasis on the impact of race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality in global perspective. Materials and methodologies are drawn from a variety of disciplines.

REL 0104 - FEMINIST THEOLOGIES

Survey of feminism's impact on the religious commitments of women and on traditional religious institutions, beliefs, and practices. Feminist scholarship in the study of scriptural texts and other historical sources, the rise of women's rituals and alternative spiritualities, religious feminism in relation to other struggles for human dignity and liberation and how the inclusion of women's perspectives is influencing the craft of theology itself.

REL 0196 - RELIGIONS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

An exploration of religion as both a transnational and subnational force in international relations, focused on five of the world's major faith groups/spiritual paths: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. How a region's religious traditions and practices play, or should play, a central role understanding a region.

Fall 2010

ED 0162 - CLASS, RACE, AND GENDER IN THE HISTORY OF U.S. EDUCATION

Collee Worrell
History of education in the United States as a struggle over access and control. Relation to class reproduction, social mobility, the maintenance of and resistance to racial boundaries and gender issues, emphasizing the struggles of disempowered groups to gain access to schooling in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

ED 0164 - EDUCATION FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE

(Cross-listed as Peace and Justice Studies 164)
Past and present efforts to use education for building a just and peaceful society. The advocacy of education in democratic societies, emphasizing the works of contemporary critical, antiracist, and feminist theorists. Peace pedagogies, curricula, and programs focused on social justice. Participation in a "mini-internship" focused on peace and social justice issues in an educational program.

ED 0165 - EDUCATING WOMEN AND GIRLS

Use of feminist theory to explore how women and girls of different race, class, and ethnic identities have struggled to define and claim a meaningful education for themselves both globally and locally. Analysis of educational theories, curriculum, and classroom practices from the perspective of gender.

ED 0167 - CRITICAL RACE THEORY SEMINAR: ISSUES IN URBAN EDUCATION

(Cross-listed as American Studies 186)
Sabina Vaught
An advanced theoretical seminar on race, class, gender and the political economy of urban schooling. Topics studied may include, but are not limited to welfare, law, labor policy, school policy.

ENG 0045 - NON-WESTERN WOMEN WRITERS

An introduction to post-World War II women authors from the non-West, a problematic term used here as a starting point for discussion about the impact of colonization and the effects of decolonization on the social and political construction of women as a category. Writers include Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, Buchi Emecheta, Mahasweta Debi, Anita Desai, and Nawal al-Saadawi.

ENG 0046 - GIRLS' BOOKS

Introductory course on relationship between nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century novels, films and guides for girls and the changing constructions of the female subject. Topics include domesticity, sexuality, ethnicity, fantasy, and censorship. Readings may include works by Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Carolyn Keene, Louise Fitzhugh, Judy Blume, Katherine Paterson, Angela Johnson, Francesca Block, Carol Gilligan, and Michel Foucault.

PHIL 0048 - FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY

Investigation of the implications of a feminist point of view for philosophical inquiry and for various philosophical issues. Practical ethical problems such as abortion, sexual harassment, and pornography, and theoretical issues such as the nature of equality and gender difference will be discussed. Core course in the Women's Studies Program.

PSY 0119 - FAMILY DYNAMICS AND THERAPY

Introduction to family dynamics as well as to techniques of family diagnosis, interventions, and therapy.

PSY 0136 - STEREOTYPES, PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION

Anne Krendl
Seminar examining social psychological research on stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Considers cognitive, affective, motivational, and contextual influences in the context of current and historical events.

WS 0073 - INTRODUCTION TO QUEER STUDIES

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies through an examination of key texts and practices. Course will interrogate notions of normality; binary systems of sex, gender, and sexuality; and cultural representations of personhood, citizenship and family. It will examine the application of queer theory in fields such as economics, anthropology, literature, cultural studies, and film studies. Of particular concern will be ways gender and sexuality intersect with race, ethnicity, nationality, and class.

WS 0190 - SENIOR COLLOQUIUM: DOING FEMINIST RESEARCH

Practices and methods of feminist interdisciplinary research in a cross-cultural framework. How feminist inquiry rethinks disciplinary assumptions and categories; what counts as knowledge; relation between subjects and objects of study; international issues in feminist analysis. To be taken in preparation for senior project. Required of all majors and minors.

CIV 0017 - LOVE & SEXUALITY - WORLD LITERATURE

(Cross-listed as World Literature 17)
Comparative examination of representations of love and sexuality in Japanese and Russian literature with supplementary guest lectures from Judaic and Chinese culture. Specific issues to be addressed across a diverse body of literature, film, and art include 1) the fusion of sexuality and romance, 2) love as a problem/love as an ideal, 3) societal conventions as to so-called proper or normative behavior (the various ways hetero- and homosexuality, celibacy, and hedonism have been understood nd commented upon in artistic media). All discussions and readings in English.