Health Promotion and Prevention

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Through education and prevention initiatives, we provide resources related to alcohol and drugs, nutrition, physical activity, sleep, stress management among others. We utilize a public health approach focusing on the impact of the environment on healthy communities and work collaboratively with undergraduates, graduate students, and student groups.

Time to Quit     Health Impacts of Vaping     Environmental Effects of Vaping Poster

Resources to Quit Vaping

 

  • Electronic cigarettes – or e-cigarettes — are also called vapes, e-hookahs, vape pens, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS).
  • Using an e-cigarette product is commonly called vaping.
  • E-cigarettes work by heating a liquid to produce an aerosol that users inhale into their lungs.
  • The liquid can contain: nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, and other substances and additives.
  • Symptoms of Lung Injury Reported by Some Patients in This Outbreak

    • Patients in this investigation have reported symptoms such as:
      • cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
      • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
      • fatigue, fever, or abdominal pain
    • Some patients have reported that their symptoms developed over a few days, while others have reported that their symptoms developed over several weeks. A lung infection does not appear to be causing the symptoms.

    Regardless of the ongoing investigation:

    Questions about E-cigarette Use, or Vaping

    What is an e-cigarette?

    • Electronic cigarettes – or e-cigarettes – work by heating a liquid to produce an aerosol that users inhale into their lungs.
    • The liquid can contain: nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, and other substances, flavorings, and additives.
    • E-cigarettes are also called vapes, e-hookahs, vape pens, tank systems, mods, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS).

    What is vaping?

    • Using an e-cigarette is commonly called vaping.
    • Vaping can refer to using e-cigarettes to inhale many substances, including nicotine, and THC or CBD oils.

    What is causing this outbreak of lung injury?

    • All reported cases have a history of e-cigarette product use, or vaping.
    • The investigation has not identified any specific product or substance that is linked to all cases.
    • Most, but not all, patients have reported using e-cigarettes containing THC. Many report using THC and nicotine. Some report using nicotine containing products only.

    How can I protect myself?

    • Until we know more, if you are concerned about these specific health risks, CDC recommends that you consider refraining from using e-cigarette or vaping products.
    • Anyone who uses an e-cigarette or vaping product should not buy these products (e.g., e-cigarette or vaping products with THC or CBD oils) off the street, and should not modify or add any substances to these products that are not intended by the manufacturer.
    • If you are an adult who uses e-cigarettes because you have quit cigarette smoking do not return to smoking cigarettes.

    What should I do if I have used e-cigarettes and have symptoms?

    • See a healthcare provider right away if you have symptoms like those reported in this outbreak.
    • You can also call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.
    • You can also submit a detailed report of any unexpected health or product issues related to tobacco or e-cigarette products to the FDA via the online Safety Reporting Portalexternal icon.

    What if I’m an adult who quit cigarette smoking and now uses e-cigarettes?

    • If you are an adult who uses e-cigarettes because you have quit cigarette smoking, do not return to smoking cigarettes.
    • If you continue to use e-cigarettes, carefully monitor yourself for symptoms and see a healthcare provider right away if you have symptoms like those reported in this outbreak.

     

     

Tufts Health Promotion and Prevention mindfulness initiative to help reduce the stress in students’ lives.

The initiative was organized in partnership with Counseling and Mental Health Services, the University Chaplaincy, the Office of Residential Life and Learning and Cambridge Health Alliance. Read the Director of Health Promotion and Prevention Ian Wong's interview with The Tufts Daily on campus efforts to lower students' stress.

Health Promotion and Prevention offers resources for students in substance abuse recovery

Many students entering college experience a degree of excitement, anxiety and uncertainty. For students recovering from substance abuse, however, there is an added concern regarding how to sustain their recovery on a college campus.  Read the Director of Health Promotion and Prevention Ian Wong's interview with The Tufts Daily on campus efforts to support students in substance abuse recovery.

Give It A Try

"Give It A Try" is Health Promotion and Prevention's Social Norms Campaign to encourage students to take control of their health.